Main Links

Web Folders: 

A Daily Prayer Notebook Main Index

Learn to Pray Page Index -see all the p-n- documents

Bible Study Intro Index

2006 Web Edition Guest's Daily Prayer Notebook
The Latest full entire version 

My Classes Links: 

DPN Class List and Links in their Context   (to be updated as completed)

Personal Links:

CTLANYONS

Biographical Introduction

How I Was Married

Christine Wise Lanyon

Have You Ever tract

A Simple Bible Study tract

Un Estudio Bíblico
same tract in Spanish

After You Believe
tract - incorporates PNB for Christian growth

The 1980 Prayer Notebook (thumbnail graphics of the first printed PNB)

ACCESS Pages

Access all You can see articles by yours truly, pastors, and missionary web pages we're hosting, and other Christian helps here including, among others:

The Changed Connection -- Jim Berg's "Changed Into His Image" links and studies we are continuing to do.

Broken Chains Intl -- Living the Christ Life -- Kevin & Debi Daly's ministry of Counseling

Prayer Notebook's Pastor Rowley Source Page

TBC

Yann & Dawn Jouan Soon To Cameroon, West Africa

MarvinMusic Evangelist

John Moore Family Missionary to S. Africa

Family Links:

CTLanyons

Lanyon Family

Meet 'Br. Bernie'

Resources for your Family : Audio or Video

My Business Links

Glory Carpet Cleaning

1a1b10c-justice

Attribute #10C or ‘God is Just’

Review:

6C Sovereignty (plan your life, then surrender to God) 7C. Omnipresent (pray with power in the presence of God’s face– He is everywhere for everyone) 8C. Omniscient all_knowing – He knows Himself and all other things (Use His knowledge of all to understand life and pray with power for other people) 9C. Omnipotent – God is and has all power and authority (Pray asking for God to use His power in your prayer life).

From the Prayer Notebook:

God is ...

PS 9.8; JN 7.24 10C. Just (One equal to judge all)

Psalm 9:8

He shall judge the world in righteousness, And He shall administer judgment for the peoples in uprightness.

God follows what is right without showing partiality to one over another.

[personal application:] John 7:24

Do not judge according to appearance, but judge with righteous judgment."

 

Significant Scripture passages:

Ps 50:6 And the heavens shall declare his righteousness: for God is judge himself. Selah.

Ps 96:13 Before the LORD: for he cometh, for he cometh to judge the earth: he shall judge the world with righteousness, and the people with his truth.

Ps 98:9 Before the LORD; for he cometh to judge the earth: with righteousness shall he judge the world, and the people with equity.

Ps 99:4 The king's strength also loveth judgment; thou dost establish equity, thou executest judgment and righteousness in Jacob.

Ge 18:25 That be far from thee to do after this manner, to slay the righteous with the wicked: and that the righteous should be as the wicked, that be far from thee: Shall not the Judge of all the earth do right? [Abraham pleading for Lot still in Sodom]

Isa 11:4 But with righteousness shall he judge the poor, and reprove with equity for the meek of the earth: and he shall smite the earth with the rod of his mouth, and with the breath of his lips shall he slay the wicked.

Isa 11:5 And righteousness shall be the girdle of his loins, and faithfulness the girdle of his reins.

Ac 17:31 Because he hath appointed a day, in the which he will judge the world in righteousness by that man whom he hath ordained; whereof he hath given assurance unto all men, in that he hath raised him from the dead.

Ro 2:5 But after thy hardness and impenitent heart treasurest up unto thyself wrath against the day of wrath and revelation of the righteous judgment of God;

Ro 2:6 Who will render to every man according to his deeds:

Ro 2:16 In the day when God shall judge the secrets of men by Jesus Christ according to my gospel.

Re 20:12 And I saw the dead, small and great, stand before God; and the books were opened: and another book was opened, which is the book of life: and the dead were judged out of those things which were written in the books, according to their works.

Re 20:13 And the sea gave up the dead which were in it; and death and hell delivered up the dead which were in them: and they were judged every man according to their works.

Dictionary Definition: "true or correct: exact" "To be just is to follow what is right without showing favor to anyone; To be fair is to be reasonable and honest in treating all equally" – Webster’s New World Dictionary.

The Theology of God’s Justice

Augustus Strong– p. 290 Systematic Theology.

"By justice and righteousness we mean the transitive holiness of God, in virtue of which His treatment of His creatures conforms to the moral perfection of God, and justice visiting non-conformity to that perfection with penal loss or suffering."

Henry Thiessen, Lectures in Systematic Theology, p. 124.

Summary: The execution of the Laws set forth by God Himself by which He exercises punishment for offense of those laws, and this includes His acceptance of a substitute sacrifice to meet those demands.

In other words, God is just because He set up a standard for living the right way, and He revealed a punishment for not meeting that standard, as well as the possibility of a suitable substitute to collect payment for the violation.

Illustrations of God’s Justice in Scripture.

bulletJohn 7:24 Judge not according to the appearance, but judge righteous judgment.
bulletRomans chapter 2.

Applications

bulletTrust God to complete all judgment in the way He chooses!
bulletKnow evil by its fruits and judge it accordingly
bulletMatthew 7.16 "You will know them by their fruits. Do men gather grapes from thorn bushes or figs from thistles? 17 "Even so, every good tree bears good fruit, but a bad tree bears bad fruit. 18 "A good tree cannot bear bad fruit, nor can a bad tree bear good fruit. 19 "Every tree that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire. 20 "Therefore by their fruits you will know them. 22 "Many will say to Me in that day, `Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in Your name, cast out demons in Your name, and done many wonders in Your name?' 23 "And then I will declare to them, `I never knew you; depart from Me, you who practice lawlessness!'
bulletLeave judging others to God.
bulletJames 2:1 My brethren, have not the faith of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord of glory, with respect of persons.
bulletJas 2:4 Are ye not then partial in yourselves, and are become judges of evil thoughts?
bulletJas 2:9 But if ye have respect to persons, ye commit sin, and are convinced of the law as transgressors.

-------------

Verses from Romans on God’s Judgment:

Ro 2:5 But in accordance with your hardness and your impenitent heart you are treasuring up for yourself wrath in the day of wrath and revelation of the righteous judgment of God,

John Gill’s Commentary:

INTRODUCTION TO ROMANS 2

This chapter contains, in general, a vindication of the justice and equity of the divine procedure against men, such as are described in the preceding chapter; and a refutation of the several pleas that might be made by the Gentiles, who had not the law, and by the Jews who had it; and concludes with exposing the wickedness of the latter, and with showing who they are that are properly Jews, and circumcised persons, in the account of God. It begins, in #Ro 2:1, with an inference deduced from what had been said in the latter part of the foregoing chapter; concluding that such, be they who they will, Jews or Gentiles, are inexcusable, who do the things they condemn others for: but though the judgment of such persons is wrong, the apostle observes,

#Ro 2:2, that the judgment of God, in the condemnation of them, is right, of which he, and others, were fully assured; and which judgment is commended, by the rule of it, being according to truth; by the objects of it, criminals, who are left without excuse, and by the inevitable-ness of it,

#Ro 2:3, being such as cannot possibly be escaped: and though some men might hope to escape it, because not immediately punished, but loaded with the blessings of Providence, and peculiar benefits of divine goodness; yet this was to be ascribed to the forbearance of God for the present; and that if these favours were despised, and they had not a good effect upon them to bring to repentance, but instead thereof were more and more hardened under them, as their guilt would be increased, so wrath would be secretly laying up for them, which will be revealed in the day of judgment,

#Ro 2:4,5, at which time justice will be done to every man as his works will be found to be,

#Ro 2:6, then follows a description of the several sorts of persons that will be judged, and of the different things that will be their portion: as that eternal life will be given to good men,

#Ro 2:7, and the wrath of God poured down on bad men, whether they be Jews or Gentiles,

#Ro 2:8,9. The happiness of good men is repeated again, and explained, and promised to the Jew first, and then to the Gentile,

#Ro 2:10, and a reason given of this just and equal distribution, taken from the nature of God, who is no respecter of persons,

#Ro 2:11, an instance of which is produced in both Jews and Gentiles, that sin; the one perishing with, the other without the law,

#Ro 2:12, since it is not barely having and hearing the law, but acting up to it, which only can justify before God,

#Ro 2:13, upon which the apostle proceeds to refute the plea that might be made by the Gentiles, in favour of themselves, why they should not be condemned, taken from their not having the written law; for though they had not the law written on tables of stone, as the Jews had, yet they had, as he observes, the law of nature written on their hearts, against which they sinned: this he proves by the effects of it, discernible in many of them by their outward lives and conversations, in conformity to the law; and by the inward testimony of their consciences, approving of good deeds, and reproaching for bad ones,

#Ro 2:14,15, which two verses being put into a parenthesis,

#Ro 2:16, is connected with #Ro 2:13, and points at the time when the doers of the law shall be justified, even at the day of judgment: which judgment is described by the author of it, God; by the subject of it, the secrets of men's hearts; by the person employed in the divine procedure, Jesus Christ; and by the evidence and certainty of it, the Gospel preached by the apostle, and then follow a description of the Jews, an account of their profession of religion, and an ironical concession of the several characters they assumed to themselves: they are described by their name, a Jew; by their religion, which lay in trusting in the law of Moses, and in boasting of their interest in God, as the God of Israel,

#Ro 2:17, by their knowledge of the will of God, and approbation of the excellent things of his law,

#Ro 2:18, and by the characters they took to themselves,

#Ro 2:19,20, from which the apostle takes an occasion to expose the wickedness of some of their principal men, even their teachers,

#Ro 2:21,22, by whose wicked lives and conversations God was dishonoured, and his name blasphemed among the Gentiles,

#Ro 2:23,24, hence it appears, that their name, profession, and character, would not justify them before God; wherefore the apostle goes on, to remove their plea taken from circumcision, showing that could be of no use to them, but became void through their breach of the law,

#Ro 2:25, and that, on the other hand, an uncircumcised Gentile, by keeping the law from right principles, and to a right end, appeared to be the true circumcision,

#Ro 2:26, wherefore the circumcised Jew that broke the law, stood condemned by the uncircumcised Gentile that fulfilled it; so far was circumcision from being any part of his justification, or a plea in favour of it,

#Ro 2:27. Then the apostle concludes the chapter, by giving a definition of a real Jew, and of true circumcision; which he does first negatively, that it is not anything external that makes him a Jew, or anything in the flesh that is right circumcision; but secondly, positively, that it is an inward work of grace that denominates a man a Jew, in a spiritual sense, or an Israelite indeed; and that it is the circumcision of the heart, which is wrought by the Spirit of God, that is true and genuine: and such a Jew, and such a circumcision, are approved of by God, and commended by him, when the other have only praise of men,

#Ro 2:28,29, and therefore, however such persons may be justified before men, they cannot be justified in the sight of God; which is the drift and design of the apostle in the whole.

Commentary

Ver. 1. Therefore thou art inexcusable, O man, etc. Some think, from the connection of these words with the preceding chapter, that the Gentiles are here meant; and particularly those among them who seemed to be virtuous, and took upon them to be the reprovers of others, and yet did the same things themselves, as Socrates, Cato, Seneca, and others; and therefore must be inexcusable, because they knew better, and would be thought to have been so; wherefore such could never be justified before God by their works, but might be justly condemned by him, nor shall they escape his righteous judgment. Others think the Jews are meant, who despised and condemned the Gentiles, and thought themselves to be righteous persons, and justified in the sight of God; and who, though they were secretly guilty of many abominable iniquities, yet were very severe upon the sins of others, and therefore inexcusable: others think that magistrates are designed, whether among Jews or Gentiles, who reprove and punish sin in others, and therefore must be supposed to know the law, and the nature of sin, and so are inexcusable and self_condemned when they do the same things; wherefore though they may pass with impunity among men, they shall not escape the judgment of God. Rather the words respect every man, of whatsoever nation, office, or place; and may be particularly applied to hypocrites, and seem designed to correct censoriousness, and hasty judging, and to throw confusion on such who value themselves on being the censurers and reprovers of others:

whosoever thou art that judgest; whether a Jew or a Gentile, a public magistrate or a private person:

for wherein thou judgest another; that is, in what case or instance; the Complutensian edition and the Arabic version read, "in" "or with what judgment thou judgest another"; see Gill on "Mt 7:2";

thou condemnest thyself; by judging them:

for thou that judgest dost the same things; art guilty of the same thing condemned in others, and therefore must be self_condemned.

Ver. 2. But we are sure that the judgment of God, etc. By "the judgment of God," is not meant what is exercised on and towards men in this life, but what will follow after death; which is called judgment to come, is represented as certain, will be universal as to persons and things, and is here called "the judgment of God," in opposition to the judgment of men; and because it will be carried on by God only, who is omniscient and omnipotent, and will be definitive: this is and will be,

according to truth, against them which commit such things; in opposition to all hypocrisy and unrighteousness: and it may design the law and light of nature by which the Gentiles, the law of Moses by which the Jews, and the Gospel of Christ by which all have enjoyed the Gospel revelation, will be judged; or the truth of their own consciences in them all: now we may be sure of this judgment; and of its being according to truth, from reason, from Scripture, and from the being and perfections of God.

Ver. 3. And thinkest thou this, O man, that judgest them which do such things, and doest the same, etc. Some men may be so vain as to imagine, that though they do the same things which they condemn in others, they

shall escape the judgment of God: but such will find themselves most sadly mistaken; there is no avoiding the general judgment; all men must come to it; there will be no eluding it through craftiness and deceit, through bribery and corruption; there will be no escaping condign punishment, through might in the criminal, or through the judge's ignorance of his crimes, or want of ability and power to punish.

Ver. 4. Or despisest thou the riches of his goodness, etc. The apostle anticipates an objection against what he had said, taken from the prosperity of these persons; who might conclude from thence, that they were not so wicked as he had represented them; and that they should escape the judgment of God, otherwise they would have been punished by God in this life, and not have prospered as they did; which objection is removed by observing, that it was not their innocence, but "the riches of" divine "goodness, and longsuffering and forbearance," which were the causes of their prosperity: by "the riches of God's goodness," are not meant the riches of his special, spiritual, and eternal goodness, which his own people are only partakers of: but the general riches of his temporal and providential goodness, which the men of the world have commonly the greatest share of; they have it in great plenty, which is signified by "riches": and by his "longsuffering and forbearance" are designed, not his forbearance of his chosen ones and his longsuffering to them, which issue in their salvation; but his forbearance of sinners, and longsuffering towards them, in not as yet pouring down his wrath and displeasure on them; all which are "despised" by them; the riches of his goodness, when he is not glorified for his providential mercies, and in them, and when these are abused to the lusts of men. The

forbearance of God is despised, when men on account of it harden themselves in sin; and his

longsuffering, when they deny his concern in Providence, or a future judgment, and promise themselves impunity. Moreover, the apostle obviates the above objection by asserting that God's end in his goodness, forbearance, and longsuffering, was not to testify to their innocence, as they imagined, but to lead them to repentance, of which they were ignorant;

not knowing that the goodness of God leadeth thee to repentance. This is to be understood not of a spiritual and evangelical repentance, which is a free grace gift, and which none but the Spirit of God can lead, or bring persons to; but of a natural and legal repentance, which lies in an external sorrow for sin, and in an outward cessation from it, and reformation of life and manners, which the goodness of God to the Jews should have led them to; who had a large share of the good things of life, a land flowing with milk and honey, and many outward privileges which other nations had not, as the giving of the law, the covenant and promises, the word and ordinances; and repentance here chiefly designs, as it may respect the Gentiles, a change of mind and practice in them relating to idolatry and superstition Now the providential goodness of God has a tendency to lead persons to repentance on this account; but of this end of divine goodness the Gentiles were ignorant; nor was this end answered thereby; which shows the wretched depravity of human nature; see #Ac 14:15-17.

Ver. 5. But after thy hardness and impenitent heart, etc. The apostle goes on to show, that such persons who promise themselves impunity on the score of prosperity, shall not always go unobserved and unpunished; for there is a day of wrath and righteous judgment hastening on, and will take place after they have filled up the measure of their iniquity. There is a natural "hardness" of the heart in every son and daughter of Adam; and there is an acquired habitual hardness, which is increased by sinning; and a judicial one, which God, for sin, sometimes gives persons up unto. An "impenitent heart" is not only an heart which does not repent, but such an one as cannot repent, being harder than the nether millstone. Now men, by such hardness and impenitence,

treasure up unto [themselves] wrath: they are the authors of their own destruction; by which is meant the wrath of God, in opposition to the riches of his goodness, despised by them; and is in reserve for wicked men: and is laid up

against, and will be brought forth in

the day of wrath; which the Scriptures call "the evil day," #Am 6:3 #Eph 6:13; the day fixed by God, when he will call men to an account for their sins, and stir up all his wrath against them:

and revelation; that is, the day of revelation, when Christ shall be revealed from heaven in flames of fire, the sins of men shall be revealed, and the wrath of God against them:

of the righteous judgment of God; so some copies read; that is, the day of the righteous judgment; so the Arabic version reads, "and of the appearance of God, and of his righteous judgment"; for the judgment will be at the appearance of Christ, who is God, and at his kingdom, #2Ti 4:1. The Alexandrian copy reads, "and of the retribution of the righteous judgment of God"; and so the Ethiopic version seems to have read, rendering the words, "if so," or "seeing thy retribution may come upon thee," and "if the judgment of God may befall thee"; for when the judgment of God shall come, as there will be a revelation of men's sins, and of the wrath of God against them, there will be a just retribution according to their works. Or "the revelation of the righteous judgment of God"; that is, when the judgment of God, which is now hid, shall appear; and which is said to be "righteous," because it will be carried on in a righteous manner, and proceed upon, and be executed according to the strictest rules of justice and equity.